Best British Chef’s Knives

These handmade knives are perfect for serious home cooks and budding chefs. Whether it’s Nouko Knives or Blenheim Forge, these lot all sell some serious kit.
One piece 065 02
Two Sticks Forge make some beautiful blades.

A blunt knife is a dangerous knife. It’s common knowledge among cooks that you’re far more likely to cut yourself using a crappy knife in the kitchen than you are using something that could glide through a sheet of A4 paper with ease. Having a sharper knife will not only make it safer for you to cook your way through Nigella’s oeuvre but it’ll make it much easier, too. Dicing, slicing, chopping, and julienning are all a breeze when you’re got a tool that’s up for the job.

We’ve already had a go at rounding up some of the Best Value Kitchen Knives for anyone that’s looking to dip their pinky toe into the world of quality kitchen kit but this guide isn’t about those beginner blades. No, Mob – this guide to the Best British chef’s knives is one for the home cooks who are ready to take their culinary skills to the next level as well as any bonafide chefs out there who are working in professional kitchens and want to draw lots and lots of attention to themselves. These flashy, effective knives are all (pardon the pun) at the cutting edge of the handmade British kitchen blade scene. Yes, that is a scene. And, no, I haven’t made it up.

They’re not cheap but all of these knives are a worthy investment to make. Especially if you’re the sort of person that gets a kick out of owning a small sword that comes with its own protective sheath. Most of these knives (from Blok Knives and their beautiful pieces to Blenheim Forge’s agile objects) are handmade and forged with precision by people who really care about their craft. They’re not toys and you shouldn’t treat them like one. Oh, and seeing as we’ve limited this to Britain this time around, I’d also like to give a shoutout to some of the top knife makers in Ireland including Hazenberg Knives, Lew Griffin Knives, and Dunn Bladeworks.

Grab your Japanese whetstone, get out your wallet, and prepare to find out about where some of the best British chef’s knives are made.

Prendergast Knives

Dan Prendergast

Dan Pendergast has been a blacksmith for almost 20 years now. If we’re to take Malcolm Gladwell's 10,000 hours spiel as gospel then that means Prendergast is a man who is exceedingly good at being a blacksmith. Which he is. Working out of a stone shed in Gloucestershire, Dan produces knives under the umbrella of Prendergast Knives. His high carbon steel blades and sustainably managed hardwood handles combine for a knife that’s visually appealing and delivers top performance across the board.

Savernake Knives

Savernake

As one of the UK’s premium knife brands, Savernake is responsible for making slick custom blades suitable for everyone from amateur enthusiasts to Michelin-starred chefs. “Balance, geometry, comfort, sharpness, weight and precision” are Savernake’s main priorities when making its products; each knife is designed so that it delivers optimum performance on the chopping board. Their custom knife configurator also lets you create your own bespoke blade from over 44,380 options. Nab yourself one of those if you want a knife that no one else in the entire world will have. If you're after something slightly more affordable then Savernake's DNA range is worth exploring – you can still select from a few different coloured handles and get a free engraving but the price point is much friendlier.

Blenheim Forge

Blenheim Forge specialises in Japanese-inspired chef’s knives that are all meticulously handmade in Peckham. Not only are these made with the highest quality materials (the ‘Santoku’ blade has a Japanese blue paper steel core with folded iron cladding and a walnut handle) but they also look extremely cool. They’re rather dear but considering the amount of craftsmanship put into every knife, they’re worth the price tag. You’ll be the envy of every food nerd with one of these in your arsenal.

Blok Knives

Blok Knives hi res 2 124 copy

A multi-purpose kitchen knife that’s suitable for handling meat, fish, and pretty much anything you throw its way, the Blok Knives chef knife is one of the best around. Owner Ben Edmonds started Blok Knives out of his cellar at home and each knife he’s made since then has only got better and better. Ben’s moved out of his cellar and now handmakes the knives out of his workshop in Derbyshire but he hasn’t lost the drive and passion that made him start Blok in the first place. The 8” chef’s knife he makes is a proper handsomely rugged-looking thing (think a cutlery steel version of Jason Statham) with a forced patina finish that offers accuracy and delicacy.

Katto Knives

Katto Knives is the London-based creation of two best friends who wanted to help home cooks feel more comfortable in the kitchen. The knives might not be as high-spec as some of the others on this list of the best British chef’s knives but they’re still really quality and come in at a much more affordable price. Japanese steel blades are fitted with hand-carved wooden handles in Katto’s range of very aesthetic and very agile knives. These are good knives from good people.

Clement Knives

Tim Westley is a bladesmith and a recycler who transforms plastic and metal waste that he finds into hand-forged knives. Clement Knives is his baby and it’s one of the most aspirational projects that I’ve seen come to life. The knives that Tim makes are stunning, effective, and surprisingly affordable. He does, however, only ever make a very limited run so you’ve got to be quick off the mark to beat off everyone else that’s clamouring to get their hands on one of these beauties.

Nouko Knives

Nouko Knive

Based out of Bristol, Nouko’s hand-forged knives are a proper buy-it-for-life purchase. Whether you’re after a petty all-rounder or a stylish gyuto, every knife that Nouko makes is crafted with the utmost precision and made from high-quality materials. These are built to last and if you treat them right, they’ll treat you right back in return.

TOG Knives

TOG

The perfect knife isn’t just capable of slicing an onion into see-through half crescents, it’s also capable of going the distance and withstanding the use and abuse of a busy kitchen. TOG Knives have been tested on chefs in professional kitchens ever since the first was produced and each iteration has improved on the last. TOG’s blades are made by hand by eight tiny companies in Seki – a Japanese town that’s renowned for traditional swordmaking. TOG Knives are for the real heads out there.

Two Sticks Forge

Knives setting 01

Andrew Lindsay is a knifemaker in the Ashdown Forest who specialises in culinary knives for professional chefs and home cooks. Joined by a team of talented colleagues, Andrew’s Two Sticks Forge is responsible for some exceedingly handsome Japanese knives. Two Sticks Forge uses a range of materials (including top Japanese cutlery steels like VG10 and Aogami Super) to make their knives along with some classic vintage materials. Andrew’s used the leaf springs from a 1932 MG Midget in a previous model and even the handles of the knives are made from local bog oak sourced from the East Anglian Fens. Each blade has a real story to tell.

Joel Black Knives

Located in rural Herefordshire, the Joel Black Knives forge is a place where quality knives are forged, ground, finished, and handled. Head blacksmith Joel Black (what else did you expect his name to be?) is a real class act and has proved himself to be a real student of the game throughout his years of being a knifemaker. Joel folds his own steel, stabilises his own wood, and ensures that every piece that he sells is the best damn version of itself that’s possible. Most of the knives made by Joel Black Knives are carbon steel and should be treated with care. Never ever, ever put these in the dishwasher, Mob.

Simon Maillet Knives

Simon

Simon Maillet is a Sheffield-based bladesmith who forges his knives using locally-sourced carbon steel and wood. His work is impeccable and, having worked as a chef himself, he understands the importance of the blade and understands a good knife needs to be able to perform all sorts of jobs in the kitchen. Although there are some ready-made knives listed on the website, most of Simon’s knives are made to order. Having one of these in your leather knife roll will let everyone around you know that you know quality when you see it.

Related Content

Eat Like A Man
Barbecues and meat have become twisted signals of chargrilled masculinity. So, what does it actually mean to eat like a man?
What Is Raw Milk Cheese? And Why Should You Be Eating It?
Always wanted to all the fuss about raw milk cheese is? We've enlisted the help of wine and food specialist to tell us all about it.
Mob Meets... Andy Baraghani
Having worked his way from the kitchen at Chez Panisse to one of America’s largest food media empires, Andy Baraghani is going it alone with his new cookbook.
Best Barbecue Cookbooks
There’s more to a barbecue than throwing some sausages on the grill. Here are some of the best barbecue cookbooks of all time.
A Beginner’s Guide to Wine
A super basic introduction to all the different types of wine that exist, this beginner’s guide should help you out next time you’re daunted by a wine list.
Where To Eat In Glasgow
Looking for the best restaurants in Glasgow? Aren’t we all. This is our guide on where you should be eating in this lively Scottish city.